Brazilian Journal of Pulmonology

ISSN (on-line): 1806-3756 | ISSN (printed): 1806-3713

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Bronchoscopy for foreign body removal: where is the delay?

Broncoscopia para remoção de corpo estranho: onde está o atraso?

Alexandre Garcia de Lima, Nelson Alves dos Santos, Elen Renate Figueira Rocha, Ivan Felizardo Contrera Toro

J Bras Pneumol.2008;34(11):956-958

Abstract PDF PT PDF EN Portuguese Text

This was a retrospective analysis of the medical charts of 145 patients treated at the Bronchoscopy and Thoracic Surgery Clinic of the Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Estadual de Campinas (HC-Unicamp, State University of Campinas Hospital das Clínicas) over a period of 10 years. There was a significant difference related to the site of first medical visit (HC-Unicamp versus other institutions) in terms of the time elapsed between the suspicion of bronchial aspiration and the actual respiratory endoscopic examination. However, no significant difference was found in the rate of positive results. The low number of referral centers that provide emergency respiratory endoscopy can negatively influence the treatment of patients under suspicion of bronchial aspiration, jeopardizing the overall recovery in the mid- and long-term.

 


Keywords: Airway obstruction; Respiratory aspiration; Bronchoscopy.

 


The incidence of residual pneumothorax after video-assisted sympathectomy with and without pleural drainage and its effect on postoperative pain

Incidência de pneumotórax residual após simpatectomia torácica videotoracoscópica com e sem drenagem pleural e sua possível influência na dor pós-operatória

Alexandre Garcia de Lima, Giancarlo Antonio Marcondes, Ayrton Bentes Teixeira, Ivan Felizardo Contrera Toro, Jose Ribas Milanez de Campos, Fábio Biscegli Jatene

J Bras Pneumol.2008;34(3):136-142

Abstract PDF PT PDF EN Portuguese Text

Objective: To determine the incidence of residual pneumothorax after video-assisted thoracic sympathectomy, with and without postoperative pleural drainage, and to evaluate the possible influence of this type of pneumothorax on postoperative pain within the first 28 postoperative days. Methods: All patients presenting symptoms consistent with primary palmoplantar hyperhidrosis and treated at the Thoracic Surgery Outpatient Clinic of the State Hospital of Sumaré between July and December of 2006 were included. All were submitted to sympathectomy up to the third ganglion using video-assisted thoracoscopy and were randomized to receive or not receive postoperative pleural drainage for 3 h. Chest X-rays and low-dose computed tomography scans of the chest were performed on the first postoperative day in order to determine the incidence of residual pneumothorax. At different time points up to postoperative day 28, patient pain was assessed using a visual numeric scale and by measuring the quantity of opioid analgesics required. Results: This study comprised 56 patients, 27 submitted to bilateral pleural drainage and 29 not submitted to drainage. There was no statistical difference between the two groups in terms of the incidence of post-sympathectomy residual pneumothorax. Residual pneumothorax diagnosed through any of the methods did not influence pain within the first 28 postoperative days. Conclusion: Performing closed pleural drainage for 3 h immediately after video-assisted thoracic sympathectomy did not affect lung re-expansion or the incidence of residual pneumothorax. When residual pneumothorax was present, it did not affect pain within the first 28 postoperative days.

 


Keywords: Hyperhidrosis; Sympathectomy; Pain, postoperative; Pneumothorax; Drainage; Pleura.

 


Postintubation injuries and open surgical tracheostomy: should we always perform isthmectomy?

Sequelas pós-intubação e traqueostomia cirúrgica aberta: devemos sempre fazer a istmectomia?

Alexandre Garcia de Lima, Ariovaldo Marques, Ivan Felizardo Contrera Toro

J Bras Pneumol.2009;35(3):227-233

Abstract PDF PT PDF EN Portuguese Text

Objective: To evaluate the influence of the surgical team (general surgery or thoracic surgery) and the surgical technique (with or without isthmectomy) on the incidence of postintubation injuries in the airways of tracheostomized patients. Methods: Between January 1st and August 31st, 2007, 164 patients admitted to the adult intensive care unit and tracheally intubated for more than 24 h were studied prospectively at the Sumaré State Hospital, located in the city of Sumaré, Brazil. When tracheostomy was necessary, these patients were randomly assigned to thoracic or general surgery teams. All of the patients were submitted to fiberoptic tracheoscopy for decannulation or late evaluation of the airway. Results: Of the 164 patients in the study, 90 (54.88%) died (due to causes unrelated to the procedure), 67 (40.85%) completed follow-up, and 7 (4.27%) were lost to follow-up. Of the 67 patients who completed follow-up, 32 had undergone tracheostomy (21 by the general surgery team and 11 by the thoracic surgery team), and 22 had been submitted to isthmectomy (11 by the general surgery team and 11 by the thoracic surgery team). There was no difference between the surgical teams in terms of the incidence of stoma complications. However, there was a significant difference when the surgical techniques (with or without isthmectomy) were compared. Conclusions: Not performing isthmectomy in parallel with tracheostomy leads the surgeon to open the tracheal stoma more distally than expected. In such cases, there were more stoma complications.

 


Keywords: Tracheostomy; Intensive care units; Tracheal stenosis.

 


 

 


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CNPq, Capes, Ministério da Educação, Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia, Governo Federal, Brasil, País Rico é País sem Pobreza
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E-mails: jbp@jbp.org.br
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